Caitlin O’Brien

Photo+courtesy+of+Wesley+Works.

Photo courtesy of Wesley Works.

Caroline Schaffer, Deputy Features Editor

During her four years at Emmaus High School, Caitlin O’Brien emerged herself into a variety of clubs and organizations. In addition to being Deputy News Editor of The Stinger, O’Brien holds the position of president of both Science Olympiad and Science Fair and vice president of Math Team. In school, she was involved in the EHS Marching Band as a flute player and drum major, Concert Band for the french horn, Flute Ensemble, American Computer Science League, Academic Team, National Honor Society, and Tri-M Music Society. As well as her involvement with school organizations, O’Brien participates in club volleyball and Girl Scouts outside of school. 

O’Brien will attend Massachusetts Institute of Technology this fall as a double major in physics and electrical engineering and computer science. 

Stinger: How has being involved in a variety of clubs and organizations impacted your high school experience? 

O’Brien: I’d rather be involved with a lot of different activities because it provides several outlets from the standard high school experience and course load. I don’t think I would be as happy and content with myself if I wasn’t involved in things that I know would help people or work towards a goal of some sort. 

Stinger: What was your most memorable high school experience? 

O’Brien: I’d say being in the marching band because almost every day after school I was able to hang out with really amazing people and friends. We shared very fun experiences together at football games and competitions. 

Stinger: How did you get involved with The Stinger?

O’Brien: I had Ms. Reaman freshman year for English Honors and she enjoyed my writing. So sophomore year she offered me the opportunity to write articles for The Stinger. Then junior year, I officially joined the staff as copy editor. 

Stinger: How would you say being a part of The Stinger has impacted you?

O’Brien: It has impacted me on two fronts. The first being I am obviously a better writer and second being a more continuous writer. I am more aware of the importance of what I write and how it can affect people and there is an underlying responsibility with that. 

Stinger: What is one thing that you can take with you from your time on The Stinger?

O’Brien: I believe I can take confidence with me because I now feel more comfortable through interviews talking to people, and I am more cognizant of their stories and how differing perspectives shape opinion. 

Stinger: How do you feel you have changed since freshman year?

O’Brien: Obviously I feel more intelligent from learning everything. Through the guidance of teachers and friends, I also feel like a better person which I learned over the past four years is ultimately the most important. 

Stinger: Who is your biggest inspiration and why?

O’Brien: My grandmother because she went through a lot of hardship in her life and it forced her to be resourceful and independent. I admire those traits in her and try to embody them in my own life. 

Stinger: What was your favorite project you worked on during your time with The Stinger and why?

O’Brien: It was a horrible time but honesty last year during the COVID-19 instance. I enjoyed having more time to work with the other editors, especially Heather, to write articles and stories that I knew gave information and a sense of hope when there was not much at the time. 

Stinger: What is something that most people don’t know about you?

O’Brien: A few people know this part but I was born in a different state and went through a lot of different schools throughout my life. I always felt very unsettled and not very content with where I was. I’ve always felt uncomfortable in that way and it has made everything more challenging throughout the years. 

Stinger: Do you have any regrets looking back on your high school years? 

O’Brien: Not many but I would say that I wish freshman year I was more outgoing and took more advantage of opportunities.